NH Photography: Critters Around Our House This Fall

Nothing particularly profound today. I thought I would just share a smattering of pictures of critters that can be found on most any given early fall day around our home near Akron OH.

Ladybug on grass. The blue background here is a blue tarp in the backyard which I use to rake leaves onto.  Photo: Joel Duff

Ladybug on grass. The blue background here is a blue tarp in the backyard which I use to rake leaves onto. Photo: Joel Duff

Ladybug on grass. Photo: Joel Duff

Ladybug on grass. Photo: Joel Duff

The last couple of days there have been thousands of ladybugs swarming around the backyard looking for a place to overwinter.

Moth on sandstone blocks around our front door.  This picture was taken under low-light setting.   Photo: Joel Duff

Moth on sandstone blocks around our front door. This picture was taken under low-light setting. Photo: Joel Duff

I am always amazed by the ability of these moths to blend into their environment.   Just look how this moth fits the texture and tones of the sandstone on which it is sitting.  We have a darker brick exterior on the front of the house but these moths always find their way to the rim of light sandstone blocks that go around the front door.  I assume they do this while it is still dark or at least not completely light yet which makes it all the more amazing.

Do you see the moth?  Several of these have been "hiding" on the sandstone blocks around my front door the past month.  Photo: Joel Duff

Do you see the moth? Several of these have been “hiding” on the sandstone blocks around my front door the past month. Photo: Joel Duff

If I am reading my woolly bear caterpillar right it looks like a mild winter coming up.

If I am reading my woolly bear caterpillar right it looks like a mild winter coming up.

Several lacewings have also taken up residence during the day around our front door.  Photo: Joel Duff

Several lacewings have also taken up residence during the day around our front door. Photo: Joel Duff

This white moth was waiting out the day our the screen on our front window.  Photo: Joel Duff

This white moth was waiting out the day our the screen on our front window. Photo: Joel Duff

More gnat swarms in my backyard. 1/200 sec exposure.  Image credit: Joel Duff

A gnat swarm in my backyard. 1/200 sec exposure. Image credit: Joel Duff

I posted a whole series of pictures, including this one, of the gnat swarms in my back ground earlier (NH Photography: Gnats swarming above grass).

Toad-grass-backyard-2013-ohioWe also have deer and the occasional coyote pass through but deer are boring and coyotes are a bit difficult to capture on camera although I am always trying.

When my kids opened the front door to catch the bus this morning this is what they saw on the outer glass door.  This little frog is about 1 1/2 inches long. Photo: Joel Duff

When my kids opened the front door to catch the bus this morning this is what they saw on the outer glass door. This little frog is about 1 1/2 inches long. Photo: Joel Duff

Brown tree frog on the glass of our front door at 6 am this morning (Oct 31). Photo: Joel Duff

Brown tree frog on the glass of our front door at 6:50 am this morning (Oct 31). Photo: Joel Duff

Comments

  1. White Hickory Tussock Moth Caterpillar is poisonous, and letting that little girl handle it is irresponsible.

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    • Thanks, that is very helpful. Ironically I’m usually the one saying “dont’ touch that.” Seems that they can be toxic and I will make note of that by editing the text.

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  2. Anonymouse says:

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  3. Usually it might just cause a slight rash. Don’t be alarmist, Anonymous. But yes, you should probably teach your kids not to handle.

    “For most of us, a close encounter of the HTM kind results in a burning, nettle-type, itchy rash. Cleaning the sting with soap and water, dabbing on some ammonia or calamine lotion, and topping it off with some ice should handle the problem. More sensitive souls can experience swelling and nausea and may have to see a doctor. The fuzzy setae that cover the caterpillar’s body are barbed and are mechanically irritating, especially if accidentally rubbed in the eyes. Wikipedia reports that HTMs can bite, making them triple threats.”

    http://www4.uwm.edu/fieldstation/naturalhistory/bugoftheweek/hickory-tussock-moth.cfm

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