NH Photography: Devils Tower National Monument

On our way to the bighorn basin last month we stopped at Devils Tower National Monument in Wyoming. It was a beautiful cool morning and so we took the 1.3 mile hike around the base of the tower.  From there we were able to watch several climbers scaling the sides.  Unlike Mt. Rushmore which always leaves me feeling underwhelmed.  Devils Tower exceeded my expectations. It felt bigger standing at its base than I imagined it would.   Below are a couple of pictures I took at and around the monument.

Devils Tower, Wyoming. HDR composition looking from the south. Image: Joel Duff, June 2016.

Devils Tower, Wyoming. HDR composition looking from the south. Image: Joel Duff, June 2016.

First sighting of Devils Tower coming up from the south. Image: Joel Duff

First sighting of Devils Tower coming up from the south. Image: Joel Duff

Getting closer to Devils Tower from the south. Image: Joel Duff, June 2016

Getting closer to Devils Tower from the south. Image: Joel Duff, June 2016

Family-Devils-Tower

The family from in front of the Prarie Dog town below Devils Tower. Image: Joel Duff

Red sedimentary rock that lies just below the tower. Image: Joel Duff

Red sedimentary rock that lies just below the tower (the tower is to the left of this exposure). Image: Joel Duff

Can you see the rock climbers in the image? Photo: Joel Duff

Can you see the rock climbers in the image? Photo: Joel Duff

Another family shot from the hike around the base of the tower. Photo: Joel Duff

Another family shot from the hike around the base of the tower. Photo: Joel Duff

An artistic retouching of and HDR composition from the base of the Tower. HDR image: Joel Duff.

An artistic retouching of and HDR composition from the base of the Tower. HDR image: Joel Duff.

One interpretation of the origin of Devils Tower

One interpretation of the origin of Devils Tower.

The tower is likely the remains of a volcanic plug from molten rock that either spewed out onto the surface or solidified in the sedimentary rock before reaching the surface.  Either way the presence of this great tower of igneous rock tells us that in the past the surface was once 900 more feet higher than it is today.  Since then many layers of sedimentary rock have eroded to expose this rock.

The prarie dogs are more than willing to pose for pictures if you spend a few minutes waiting for them to get used to you. Photo: Joel Duff, June 2016.

The prairie dogs at the base of the tower are more than willing to pose for pictures if you spend a few minutes waiting for them to get used to you. Photo: Joel Duff, June 2016.

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